Presentations and Publications

We have repeatedly shown that a chemical mixture of androstenol and androsterone increases flirtatious behavior in women during 15 minutes of exposure. These women also reported that they were significantly more attracted to the man wearing the mixture, which is the same mixture used in the Scent of Eros products. From 2007 to 2010 we presented results six times during five different scientific assemblies. You can track our scientific progress with this effective mixture of human pheromones via these presentations (listed below).

In 2007, our title included the caveat “…may condition…” We then responded to the comments of other researchers who had seen our work by incorporating a masking odor as a control and replicating our results. Beginning in 2009 we were able to state clearly that “Human pheromones increase women’s observed flirtatious behaviors and ratings of attraction.”

It took 8 years from the time of the Scent of Eros product debut to scientifically conclude what was obvious from the anecdotal evidence provided in testimonials by people who used the product. During this time the scientific basis for product claims became clear. Our study results exemplify how science is used to support the fact that human pheromones elicit effects on hormones and affects on behavior, just as it was expected they would from the studies of other species. The science is real. There’s no magical aphrodisiac involved; it’s just “chemistry”.

Presentations:

Kohl, J.V., Kelahan, L.C. & Hoffmann, H. (2010). Human pheromones increase women’s observed flirtatious behaviors and ratings of attraction. International Society for Human Ethology. Madison, Wisconsin.

Kohl, J.V., Kelahan, L.C. & Hoffmann, H. (2009).  Human pheromones increase women’s observed flirtatious behaviors and ratings of attraction. 13th Annual Meeting of the Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology. East Lansing, Michigan.

Kohl, J.V., Kelahan, L.C. & Hoffmann, H. (2009). Putative Human Pheromones Increase Women’s Observed Flirtatious Behaviors and Ratings of Attraction. Association for Chemoreception Sciences 31st Annual Meeting,. Sarasota, Florida.

Kelahan, L.C., Hoffmann, H, & Kohl, J.V.  (2008). Olfactory/pheromonal input and human female proceptive sexual behaviors/preferences. Society for Neuroscience. Washington, D.C.

Kelahan, L.C., Hoffmann, H, & Kohl, J.V.  (2007). Androstenol/androsterone may condition a human hormonal effect/behavioral affect. Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality 50th Anniversary Annual Meeting. Indianapolis, Indiana.

Kelahan, L.C., Hoffmann, H, & Kohl, J.V. (2007). Androstenol/androsterone may condition a human hormonal effect/behavioral affect. Association for Chemoreception Sciences 29th Annual Meeting. Sarasota, Florida.

Publications (Free full text is available for all three articles):

Kohl, J.V. (2007). “The Mind’s Eyes: Human pheromones, neuroscience, and male sexual preferences.” author’s copy Journal of Psychology & Human Sexuality 18(4): 313-369.

Kohl, J.V., et al. (2001). “Human pheromones: integrating neuroendocrinology and ethology.” full text of Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 22(5): 309-21.

Diamond, M., Binstock , T. &  Kohl , JV. (1996).  “From fertilization to adult sexual behavior.” author’s copy Horm Behav. 30(4): 333-53.