5th-6th Sept 2018 Dublin, Ireland

Nutrient-dependent pheromone-controlled feedback loops

Summary: The link from positive selection to one food energy-dependent base pair change and fixation of the mouse-model-to-human-specific EDAR V370A allele in populations on different continents attests to sympatric speciation at every level of examination that refutes the pseudoscientific nonsense of neo-Darwinian mutation-driven evolution.

Reported on 5/3/18 as: SWAT team of immune cells found in mother’s milk 

1)

“There is a feedback loop,” says Yu. It’s known that some immune cells like leucocytes, another white blood cell that fights infection, increase in the milk in response to an infection in the baby.

2)

…the largest immune cell population in breast milk is macrophages, which ILCs are known to direct. Macrophages, which literally means ‘big eaters,” are the largest of the white blood cells and much-better studied than ILCs. They are known for their ability to envelop unwanted items like bacteria, viruses…

Environmental selection during the last ice age on the mother-to-infant transmission of vitamin D and fatty acids through breast milk 4/23/18

The frequency of the human-specific EDAR V370A allele appears to be uniquely elevated in North and East Asian and New World populations due to a bout of positive selection likely to have occurred circa 20,000 y ago. The dental pleiotropic effects of this allele suggest an even higher occurrence among indigenous people in the Western Hemisphere before European colonization. We hypothesize that selection on EDAR V370A occurred in the Beringian refugium because it increases mammary ductal branching, and thereby may amplify the transfer of critical nutrients in vitamin D-deficient conditions to infants via mothers’ milk. This hypothesized selective context for EDAR V370A was likely intertwined with selection on the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) gene cluster because it is known to modulate lipid profiles transmitted to milk from a vitamin D-rich diet high in omega-3 fatty acids.

Reported as: Gene linked to breastfeeding may have boosted survival of earliest Americans (4/23/18)

…they carried a genetic mutation—revealed in ancient teeth—that boosted the development of milk ducts in women’s breasts, which may have helped nursing mothers pass more nutrients to their infants.

The obvious link from infant nutrition to healthy longevity was reported in the context of a ridiculous gene-centric theory of species survival. Gene-centric theories are all that pseudoscientists have left. They use them to hold back the scientific progress made by serious scientists like those who reported this:
Feedback loops link odor and pheromone signaling with reproduction (2005)

These results may reflect a strategy wherein GnRH neurons can modify diverse functions in order to coordinate the internal state of the animal and its behavior with reproduction in order to optimize reproductive success.